Review: Christmas by Accident by Camrom Wright

Carter is an insurance adjuster whose longing for creative expression spills over sometimes into his accident reports.

Abby works for her adoptive father, Uncle Mannie, in the family bookstore, the ReadMore Cafe.

Carter can barely tolerate Christmas; Abby loves it. She can’t wait past October to build her favorite display, the annual Christmas book tree stack, which Carter despises.

When an automobile accident throws Carter and Abby together, Uncle Mannie, who is harboring secrets of his own, sees a chance for lasting happiness for his little girl. But there are so many hurdles, and not much time left. Will this Christmas deliver the miracles everyone is hoping for?

Release Date: Sept. 25, 2018. Pre-order Available.


My Review:

This was a nice story about finding joy in family, set to the  Christmas season.

This review will contain spoilers.

Continue reading “Review: Christmas by Accident by Camrom Wright”

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Review: So I Married an Anti-fan

 

Modern-day woman Geunyoung Lee struggles to make ends meet working as a lowly reporter for a magazine. She lives with a friend and barely scratches out her rent every month. On the other hand, male sex symbol Joon Hoo currently rides on top of the world. His movies become instant hits. Corporations clamber all over each other to pay for his product endorsements. Women adore him. His public image stays squeaky clean…that is, until one night he runs into Geunyoung at a club. Lee accidentally snaps a photo of Joon dumping a heartbroken young girl. He suddenly goes nuclear trying to protect his image, forcing Lee’s magazine to fire her. Now, despite losing her job and apartment, the intrepid young woman has taken on a new mission in life: Destroy Joon Hoo at all costs. This manhwa is based on the novel of the same title written by Eunjung Kim, and its production is partly supported by SBA Seoul Animation Center.


 

If you are following me here (or on my main author site) then you know that all summer long I’m sharing books that feature something about Korea.  I discovered this manhwa series awhile back, and happily read. Beautiful artwork enhances this romantic comedy.

Geunyoung is a newbie reporter. While at an event she oversees an incident with famous actor Joo Hoon.  They both jump to conclusions about the other, which  leads to some rather comedic moments. When Geunyoung is fired, she is quick to blame Joo Hoon and declares herself his anti-fan. Something the netizens don’t like. When she confronts Joo Hoon about his causing her to get fired, he decides to take a reality show gig and make her his onscreen manager. What he doesn’t expect is that he would fall in love with her.

You’ll have to read to learn more.

There is some swearing (namely the  b word), and some violence.

BUY

Review: Miss Wilton’s Waltz

miss walton's waltzSynopsis (as provided by publisher)

A follow-up to Josi S. Kilpack’s bestselling Proper Romance title The Vicar’s Daughter.

Lenora Wilton has spent her life hiding behind the keys of her beloved pianoforte and the vibrancy of her younger sister, Cassie. But Lenora is ready for a change and travels to Bath to live with her Aunt Gwen and teach music at an all-girls’ boarding school. She is different in Bath—more comfortable with herself—and enjoys the freedom and independence of her new life there.

When Lenora meets Aiden Asher, she finds herself attracted to him, but her unexpected feelings become more complicated when she learns that Catherine—Lenora’s newest and most troublesome student in the school—is Mr. Asher’s niece. Catherine is a difficult student, and Lenora works hard to make progress with the girl.

When the chemistry between Lenora and Aiden increases, they share a passionate kiss by the River Avon, and Lenora feels it is the beginning of a new forever—until she learns that Aiden has withheld an important detail about his life that changes everything.

Lenora closes her heart to him, and Aiden, caught between his obligation and his heart, must do what he can to make amends. And Lenora, after years of hiding from everyone and everything, faces a decision only she can make.


My Review:

I  noticed this title pop up on social media, so I wanted to get my hands on a copy. I had read and enjoyed The Vicar’s Daughter. 

This story continues with Lenora’s story. She’s not residing in Bath with her Aunt Gwen and teaching music as a school for girl.  Lenora is also naive and  is now sneaking out dressed as a man to sit by the river at night, which has become her place of solitude.  Her false sense of security is shattered when a stranger catches her at the river. Their paths cross again at the school, and Lenora’s quiet life becomes quite a challenge.  Will she rise to it, or run away again when things become too hard?

I loved this book. You really got a sense of Lenora’s personality, and  found her admirable. I also liked Aiden and his niece Catherine, and I rooted for them to find their happy ever after.

I received an ARC.

AMAZON   *   BARNES AND NOBLE

 

*This title hits the shelves on May 1, 2018 and is available for preorder.

Review: Ashes on the Moor

ashes on the moorSynopsis:

When Evangeline is sent to live in a small mill town in Northern England as a schoolteacher in 1871, she finds herself struggling to fit in with an unfamiliar culture. Raised with the high-class Victorian values and ideals of a sophisticated upbringing, she is unprepared for the poverty she finds in the gritty factory town of Smeatley, where the locals speak with a hard-to-understand Yorkshire accent and struggle to thrive with few resources or opportunities.

Though she has no training as a teacher, she must prove herself successful before her grandfather will release her substantial inheritance to her and allow her to be reunited with her younger sister, the last remaining member of her family after a fever claimed the lives of her parents and brothers.

Evangeline’s sudden change in circumstances is complicated when her aunt—a woman who values class distinctions more than her family relationships—forbids her from acknowledging any connection to her or to her grandfather, Mr. Farr—the man who owns nearly the entire town. For the first time in her life, Evangeline is truly alone.

Heartbroken, she turns to the one person in town who has shown her kindness—an Irish brick mason, Dermot, and his son, Ronan. Despite the difference in their classes and backgrounds, Evangeline and Dermot become friends, due in part to her ability to connect with Ronan, whose behavior requires special attention. The boy is uncomfortable around strangers and rarely even speaks to the other children in town. He often fixates on details other people ignore, and he adheres to specific, self-made rules that give his life order and structure; for example, Dermot’s coat must be hung on a specific peg next to the door.

Evangeline attempts to prove herself a worthy teacher and earn the respect of her hard-to-understand students. Determined to find a way to introduce them to “proper English” while still honoring their unique language and culture, she enlists the help of a local family to write down familiar stories in the Yorkshire vernacular. Because of her efforts, the students and their families warm to Evangeline and she continues to look for ways to give the children a chance to become more than factory workers in the local cotton mill.

When the town learns of her upper-class status, Evangeline must work twice as hard to win back their trust–especially Dermot’s. In the end, Evangeline and Dermot discover that, even though they come from different social spheres, together they can overcome social prejudices, make a positive difference in the lives of even the humblest people, and enjoy the strength that comes when two hearts find each other.

Ashes on the Moor is the inspiring love story of one Victorian woman’s courage to fight against all odds, and the man whose quiet strength gives her the confidence to keep trying.


My Review

This book was just what I needed. I love those stories that settle in and just absorb you. And Ashes on the Moor by Sarah M. Eden is exactly that.

From the first page to the last, this lovely story of love and family will enchant readers.

I quickly came to love Evangeline, Dermont, and Ronan.  Evangeline and her sister Lucy have lost their entire family. Then they are, with out much in the way of explanation or warning, separated from each other.  Already broken hearts are needlessly smashed.

The first person outside of her cold aunt and distant uncle that Evangeline meets in her new town is Dermont McCormick, and his son Ronan.  Little by little Evangeline and Dermont become friends, and Evangeline bonds with Ronan–who was so much like the brother she lost. In one endearing moment, Ronan states that they should keep her. (If you hadn’t got misty eyed yet reading this, this scene is bound to do it.)

I enjoyed on Evangeline and Dermont’s relationship built slowly over time.

I received an ARC from Shadow Mountain.

Expected publication: March 6th 2018 by Shadow Mountain

Don’t miss out.  You can go to Goodreads here to add this to your reading list.

Roxbury Rating: PG

 

Review: The Girl in the Tower

the girl in the towerSynopsis:

The magical adventure begun in The Bear and the Nightingale continues as brave Vasya, now a young woman, is forced to choose between marriage or life in a convent and instead flees her home—but soon finds herself called upon to help defend the city of Moscow when it comes under siege.

Orphaned and cast out as a witch by her village, Vasya’s options are few: resign herself to life in a convent, or allow her older sister to make her a match with a Moscovite prince. Both doom her to life in a tower, cut off from the vast world she longs to explore. So instead she chooses adventure, disguising herself as a boy and riding her horse into the woods. When a battle with some bandits who have been terrorizing the countryside earns her the admiration of the Grand Prince of Moscow, she must carefully guard the secret of her gender to remain in his good graces—even as she realizes his kingdom is under threat from mysterious forces only she will be able to stop.

SEE AT GOODREADS

BUY ON AMAZON


My Review:

I was delighted when I was offered a copy of the this book from the publisher. I had previously read and enjoyed the first book, The Bear and the Nightingale.

Medieval Russia. Not your typical fantasy world setting, and I loved my visit to it. The details are rich, and the story ran smoothly.  Unlike the first book, the pacing of this book was swift, which is fitting as our heroine, Vasya, is swept up in an adventure.

I did have a few issues with it though as a reader, and other sensitive readers may as well. The big one was the use of adult language in a few parts. (To be blunt, it was the b word that did it for me.)  For a well built world such as this narrative, that was shocking and drew me out of the story.

Now for the good, and one of my personal favorites:  Morozko. Need I say more? I loved the frost-demon in the first book, and was glad he was back. His story is intriguing and I do feel we don’t get enough of that.  His mare barely sheds insight on it, in what is a most poignant scene between the two, when she tells him that he cannot love and be immortal. I wish for more of him, and his story. (And really hope it’s in book three. Which, dear publisher, can I also have to read early?)

Another favorite is the stallion, Solovey. His steadfast devotion really shines. (I think he’s there because Morozko can’t always be there.)

And of course, we have an excellent villain in the red sorcerer, Kachei the Deathless.

Roxbury Book Rating: PG 13  Adult language, violence with bloodshed, some nudity (nonsexual), and sexual situations.

See my review for the first book:


The Bear and the Nightingale (The Winternight Trilogy, #1)The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden

This book is a little gem. The start was slow, but it really built the story up. Once Vasya was grown, the story really started moving. I wish there had been more between Vasya and Moroko. I felt I really got to know the other characters, but not so much of Moroko. I loved the personalities of the horses, and other fairy folk.
This was my first foray into Russian folklore, and it won’t be my last. This book brings that world to life, and gives it just enough of a Russian feel with out being intimidating. I’m going to re-read this one in paperback so I can smell the pages as I read it.
I received an ARC in exchange for an honest review.